Building facade of Axel Towers in Copenhagen seen from a worm's eye view
The facades of Axel Towers are made in 80 % copper and 20 % zinc

Copenhagen's five new towers

Complex geometry behind spectacular towers in Copenhagen

Copenhagen's new prestigious buildings, the Axel Towers, was a huge technical mouthful demanding unique solutions.

Following the demolition of the Scala building on Vesterbrogade in Copenhagen, something new had to happen on this historical ground.

The real-estate company Norden held architectural competitions, and the company Lundgaard & Tranberg was appointed winner with the project now known as the 'Axel Towers'.

The building which was officially opened in June 2017 has been a technical mouthful because of the huge demands of the architect. The assignment was offered in a partnership-like turnkey contract. The turnkey  contractor Züblin won the project together with NIRAS as engineering consultant.

The geometry presented major technical challenges - the buildings being without any right angles.

Hidden piping

NIRAS conducted the design of all installation works, also called M & E Engineering, provided consultancy on fire protection and was the working environment coordinator at the construction site.

A requirement from the architect was that the piping of the buildings should be hidden. This means that heating and cooling are supplied via pipes above the ceilings injected with cold or hot water, respectively, depending on the need. Thus, each room can be individually regulated.

A building without right angles

Also the geometry presented huge technical challenges. The buildings are without any right angles, and therefore there was no coordinate system, which made it difficult to specify exact dimensions for the buildings. The problem was partly solved by applying CAD design in 2D. However, all installation shafts and   one of the basements containing technical installations are in 3D.

The buildings are round and not very large in diameter. Thus, the challenge was to utilize the space optimally for elevators, pipes and other technical installations in order to optimize the scarce useful floor space.

To avoid exterior as well as interior solar protection, the glass in the windows is of different G-values depending on which direction they are facing.